Kelley likes food. Kelley cooks food. Kelley eats food all around the world. Kelley has a very close relationship with food and she’s been to known to have many opinions about restaurants, recipes, cocktails, wine and what you need to order. Here she will highlight the best food around the world, top vineyards, stand out restaurants, unique street food and of course, Kelley’s favorite, the best ice cream. She almost always gets a second opinion from a local chef, mixologist, winemaker or expert, so you don’t have to just take her word for it… enjoy!

Food Guide: Basel, Switzerland

Fondue, pretzels, flammkuchen, leckerli, beer… there is no shortage of deliciousness in Basel! Along with Swiss specialties like fondue, there’s also great international food in this diverse culinary hotspot. Of course, you’ll taste influences from nearby Germany and France, but the result is a unique type of quality Swiss food that you can only find in Basel.

I ate my way around this city, from breakfast, to lunch to dinner, to many sweets, pretzels, cocktails and beer in between. Trust me–bring your appetite and check out this video for suggestions of Basel’s best, before you go.
Featured: Confiserie Bachmann, Berower Park, Kunsthalle Basel, Walliser Kanne, Ueli Brewery

Food Guide of Valais, Switzerland

The Valais region in the South East of Switzerland is known for its sunshine! All this sun makes for a great growing season—fruits, vegetables, grains, grapes all grow very well here, making the food of the Valais so fresh and delicious. I tasted rosti, a fried potato hash, with pork sausage, at 3000 meters on top of Gornergrat and freshly made chicken with spaetzle on the Matterhorn. I sipped wines with a local vintner, ate handmade chocolates with a chocolatier and dined al fresco at family home on a hillside with a Michelin chef. Food is a way of life in the Valais, and it is savored. Don’t miss the apres ski bars in Zermatt to enjoy some of the local beers and wines too!

Featured: Chef Franck Reynaud, David Chocolates, Hotel Etrier, Hotel Pollux, Matterhorn Glacier Paradise, Gornergrat, Adrenatur Nature Park

24 Hours in the Valais, Switzerland

Glaciers, ziplines, mountain peaks and stunning views–Valais is one of Switzerland’s most gorgeous regions. I explore the best things to do in one full day from the Matterhorn to Gornergrat, fat biking in Crans Montana to dining on the best food ever. Oh and don’t forget apres ski. You will love your 24 hours in Valais.

Food Guide of the Lake Geneva Region

 

Cheese. Lake fish. Chasselas grapes. Chevreuil. Mushrooms. There’s so much good food in the Lake Geneva region, you need to come with an appetite! I toured through Vevey’s Farmer’s Market, the farms of the Pays D’enhaut, tasting the cheeses of Château-d’Oex, Michelin restaurants L’Auberge de L’Onde & La Brasserie at the Royal Savoy Hotel and sipped wines in Lavaux. Don’t miss the lake fish, the family run wineries and vineyards in Lavaux, like Domaine du Croix Duplex, and the amazing cheeses!

24 Hours in the Lake Geneva Region

The Lake Geneva region is, simply put, STUNNING. In the Canton of Vaud, the Lake Geneva region has so much natural beauty, between the centuries-old villages, the lakeside views, the UNESCO Lavaux terraced vineyards, the cosmopolitan cities and the striking mountains. We spent a day touring Vevey, stopping at the Farmer’s Market, Charlie Chaplin’s new Chaplin’s World, Nestle’s museum nest, as well at Saint Saphorin. We sipped chasselas with a family run winery in Lavaux and made local cheese up in Château-d’Oex. We explored the green countryside on the GoldenPass Panoramic train through the mountains. There’s so much to say about this amazing region, but it’s probably better to just watch.

Featured: Lausanne, Vevey, Saint-Saphorin, Lavaux, Château-d’Oex, Rougement and The Royal Savoy Hotel, The Grand Hotel du Lac, Chaplin’s World, Le Chalet, Auberge de L’onde, Domaine du Croix Duplex, Le National and more!

A Luxury Guide to Geneva, Switzerland

Switzerland is known for high quality goods, luxury items and world renowned food and Geneva is a city that perfectly embodies all of this. I spent 3 amazing days in Geneva, staying at the Hotel President Wilson, enjoying their Michelin restaurant, spa and waterfront rooms. I toured through this historic city and it’s many charming neighborhoods, checking out the watches at famous Les Ambassadeurs, sailing on a steam ship lunch cruise and exploring the trendy Carouge district. The Michelin restaurants, like La Flacon, were unrivaled. If you want to live it up in Geneva, check out some of these incredible experiences with me.

Featured: Hotel President Wilson, Les Ambassadeurs, La Savoie Steamship, Glow Bar, Bayview Restaurant by Michael Roth

Food Guide of Geneva

Geneva is internationally known as a hotspot of luxury, culture, business and FOOD. The culinary scene in Geneva benefits from it’s prime location–next to the lake, the countryside, farmland and of course, France! The local farmer’s market in Carouge gave me a taste of the regional specialties. You’ll find a mix of food in the city center, from modern cafes to historic gourmet dining. And don’t forget to reach for that Michelin guide, the city has a high number of Michelin & Gault-Millau restaurants so you’ll be eating very well for every meal here.

Featured in this video: Bayview by Michael Roth, La Flacon, La Savoie Steamship, Hotel President Wilson, Cafe du Centre, Carriage Cafe

Tohoku Japan Ginzan Onsen

The Five Places You Need to See in Tohoku

Before coming to Japan I hadn’t heard of the Tohoku Region and now I’ve been completely charmed by this pastoral, natural part of northern Japan. This is the antithesis of the bright lights and hustle and bustle of Tokyo, and that’s what makes it special. Many retreat up North to enjoy farm fresh foods, breathtaking natural beauty and to take step back into Japan’s traditional roots.

1. Spend a morning at Hirosaki Castle

Though not quite a castle in the “fairytale” sense of the word, the Hirosaki Castle is a lovely Japanese style building, with ornate roof details and impressive silhouette. However, the real reason you visit is for the vast park that surrounds it. We happened to be fortunate enough to be visiting in the spring, when the cherry blossoms were at the height of their bloom. It felt like walking through a sea of pink, every different hue, with delicate petals floating in the breeze. The cherry blossoms created avenues of flowers, and I meandered over bridges that crossed the series of pleasant canals.  Everywhere I turned was worthy of a photo–especially when I got to the viewpoint of the majestic snow capped mountain in the distance.

My Recommendation: Go there early (like 7am) if you want more flowers than people in your photos. Also, next time I go, I am bringing a picnic so I can waste an afternoon under one of the swaying sakura trees.

2. Eat Wanko-Soba

Wanco Soba

Tohoku is famous for its buckwheat noodle, soba. I tasted it in tea, in ice cream and in many variations of the noodle form. However, the best soba experience that I had was Wanko-Soba in Morioka. Here, diners are encouraged not only to eat soba but to eat as much as they can and as fast as they can. An average lunch can turn competitive as the waitresses serve you soba in small “mouthful” sized dishes. The waitresses tower over you, shouting encouragement as you slurp, refilling as fast as you can eat. Of course the other options were delicious as well–I really enjoyed their tuna sashimi and pickled vegetables. But if you plan to nab the record, don’t waste stomach space. You are going to need it since you’ll need to eat over one hundred bowls! Slurp!

My Recommendation: Bring a competitive friend and have a soba eating contest!

3. Stroll through a Samurai Village

Kakunodate

Kakunodate

Tohoku is known for it’s storied Samurai culture and to get as close as you can to it today, visit Kakunodate, a well preserved Samurai town. There is one completely original house dating back 200 years and it’s still in the ownership of its original Samurai family line. There’s another home that also has a museum, just a few steps down. The museum has an impressive display of Samurai gear, with intimidating swords and helmets. Even just wandering down the streets, stopping for an ice cream  and to admire this organized village, makes for a picturesque visit.

My Recommendation: Earlier is better to avoid the crowds!

4. Commune with Nature

Sanriku Fukkuo

The rugged coastline of Tohoku blew me away. It looked like the Mediterranean coast or even New Zealand–but it certainly did not look like Japan. The Sanriku Fukko National Park stretches along a pristine part of the coast, with three steep trails that allow you to walk through old forests and view the majestic cliffs. There are three lookouts with views, number 2 being the best.
My Recommendation: If you want a good workout, hike all the way down to the beach to get up close with the bright blue waters.

5. Visit Teapot Workshop Iwachu Nambu Tekki

IMG_1333

I hadn’t paid much attention to teapots until now. Tea is an extremely important part of Japanese culture and here at the factory, you can witness how some of the finest traditional teapots are made by hand. You can step inside the workshop, watching the craftsman painstaking create the signature dots that cover these iron pots. Each teapot takes about 2 weeks to create so it’s no wonder that they aren’t cheap. I toured the museum but was most taken by the gallery where their finest work is on display. Neon colors and even Hello Kitty tastefully grace some of the newer models of this old brand.

My Recommendation: Visit the workshop first to understand the intense labor and dedication needed to create each teapot. Then go to the shop and buy one for yourself!

BONUS TIP: GINZAN ONSEN

Ginzan

Ginzan-Onsen is a hot spring town, built lining a central spring. Stay at one of the handful of traditional style hotels, from boutique to more contemporary, each with their own onsen experience. The postcard worthy town has charming pedestrian bridges, boutique shops and several eateries. But the real reason to come here is to soak in the geo-thermal waters. I didn’t realize how therapeutic it could be until I tried it for myself. After a few minutes in the healing waters, I felt renewed from the inside out.

My Recommendation: Check out Ginzanso if you want large tatami style rooms with your own private onsen on your deck.  

For more recommendations, leave me a comment! Be sure to tune in to CNN on May 18th to watch the full video of my Tohoku experience!

The Food of Brazil

The culture of Brazil translates directly its food—each dish has a history, story and purpose. I loved the rich feijoada, the crispy acarajé, decadent churrascarias and of course, refreshing acai. We bit into the food of Bahia checking out top eats in Salvador & Lencois and then we went on a food BINGE in Rio De Janeiro. YUM. Don’t miss the caipirinhas either–they might be my favorite cocktail ever.

Show: Live like a Local in Brazil with Kelley Ferro: USTOA Travel Together